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MEHR ERFAHREN

VroniPlag Wiki
Assessing the Impact of XML/EDI with Real Option Valuation

von Dr. Shermin Voshmgir

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[1.] Svr/Fragment 021 01 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2020-02-23 19:23:29 [[Benutzer:|]]
Fragment, Gesichtet, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop, Schwartz 2001, Svr, Verschleierung

Typus
Verschleierung
Bearbeiter
SleepyHollow02
Gesichtet
Yes.png
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 21, Zeilen: 1-7
Quelle: Schwartz 2001
Seite(n): 200, 201, Zeilen: 200: last paragraph; 201: 2 ff.
[For the first time Cascading Style] Sheets (CSS) gave Web developers more control over style and layout. Style sheets work like templates where the style for a particular HTML element is defined once, and is then used over and over on any number of Web pages. In order to change how an element looks, the style sheet is modified and the element automatically changes wherever it appears. Before CSS, the only way to change the element was individually, each time it appeared. Style sheets let Webdesigners quickly create more consistent pages, and more consistent sites. Both Netscape and Internet Explorer support Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), which give Web developers more control over style and layout. (Style sheets made a limited appearance in Internet Explorer 3.0, but not in Navigator 3.0.)

[page 201]

Style sheets work like templates—you define the style for a particular HTML element once, and then use it over and over on any number of Web pages. If you want to change how an element looks, you just change the style: the element automatically changes wherever it appears. (Before CSS, you had to change the element individually, each time it appeared.) Style sheets let Web designers quickly create more consistent pages—and more consistent sites.

Anmerkungen

No source is given.

Sichter
(SleepyHollow02) Schumann


[2.] Svr/Fragment 021 12 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2020-03-21 20:07:14 [[Benutzer:|]]
Fragment, Gesichtet, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop, Seybold report on internet publishing 1997, Svr, Verschleierung

Typus
Verschleierung
Bearbeiter
Schumann
Gesichtet
Yes.png
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 21, Zeilen: 12-32
Quelle: Seybold report on internet publishing 1997
Seite(n): online, Zeilen: 0
XSL (W3C 2000b) offers more capabilities than the present CSS specification for HTML. [...] XSL adds provisions for formatting of elements based on their position in the document, handling of generated text, and the definition of formatting macros. The new style language complements XML. It also introduces an extensible set of formatting objects and is the first Web style sheet language that accommodates languages that flow in different directions than right to left.

XSL lacks many features one might want to see in a print style sheet (e.g. multiple columns, widow & orphan control, etc.), but its rule-based approach to formatting on the fly is an exciting new development in Web publishing. It will enable an XSLcapable browser to do simple things like rearranging elements and reformatting them accordingly, something that previously could happen only on the server. Furthermore it will bring new capabilities, such as adjusting box rules to the dimensions of the type composed within the box, that are not possible in HTML today. Although it goes beyond CSS, XSL is being developed so that its style sheets can be easily translated to CSS for HTML documents.

For publishers who already use SGML, the rapid pace of XML-related development and the noticeably strong interest in it by the big industry players are welcome changes from the past decade, when SGML was relegated to a niche supported only by small software suppliers or by small pockets within larger [developers.]


W3C (eds) 2000b, Extensible Stylesheet Language (XSL) Version 1.0 - W3C Candidate Recommendation 21 November 2000, [Online], Available:http://www.w3.org/TR/xsl/
Accessed: March 01 2001.

Called XSL (Extensible Style Language), the new style language offers more capabilities than the present cascading style sheet specification for HTML. XSL adds provisions for formatting of elements based on their position in the document, handling of generated text and defining formatting macros. It also introduces an extensible set of formatting objects, and is notable for being the first Web style sheet language that accommodates languages (e.g., Hebrew, Arabic) that flow in directions other than from right to left.

Although it goes beyond CSS, XSL is being developed so that its style sheets can be easily translated to CSS for HTML documents.

[...]

It lacks many specific features one might want to see in a print style sheet (e.g., multiple columns, widow and orphan control, and so forth), but its rules-based approach to formatting on the fly is an exciting new development in Web publishing. It will enable an XSL-capable browser to perform simple tasks—such as rearranging elements and reformatting them accordingly—that previously could only happen on the server. And XSL will bring new capabilities, such as adjusting box rules to the dimensions of the type composed within the box, that are not possible in HTML today. [...]

For publishers that already use SGML, the rapid pace of XML-related development and Microsoft’s noticeably strong interest in it are welcome changes from the past decade, when SGML was relegated to a niche supported only by small software suppliers or by small pockets within larger developers.

Anmerkungen

The actual source is not given.

The text cannot be found at the given reference "W3C (eds) 2000b", see https://web.archive.org/web/20010213224036/http://www.w3.org/TR/xsl/ (February 13, 2001) and https://web.archive.org/web/20010411232116/http://www.w3.org/TR/xsl/ (April 11, 2001).

Sichter
(Schumann), WiseWoman



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