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Titel    Women in Pakistan. An Economic and Social Strategy
Herausgeber    The World Bank
Ort    Washington, D.C., U.S.A.
Datum    June 1990
Reihe    World Bank Country Studies
Anmerkung    1st printing 1989, 2nd printing June 1990
ISBN    0-8213-1422-X
URL    http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/698661468775762337/Women-in-Pakistan-an-economic-and-social-strategy; http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/698661468775762337/pdf/multi-page.pdf

Literaturverz.   

yes
Fußnoten    yes
Fragmente    4


Fragmente der Quelle:
[1.] Af/Fragment 048 12 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-04-04 21:11:32 Graf Isolan
Af, Fragment, KeinPlagiat, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel, World Bank 1990, ZuSichten

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Seite: 48, Zeilen: 12-18
Quelle: World Bank 1990
Seite(n): 29, Zeilen: 12-16, 18-20
Evidence from micro level-studies, combined with deductions from the official statistics and more informal research and analyses, suggest a conservative estimate of about 20-30% of the female urban population working in the formal and informal sectors combined. Altogether it is likely that the total female work force in the urban sector (formal and informal) is just under 2.5 million women (full-time equivalents) including about 2 million in the formal sector (World Bank 1989:29).

World Bank, 1998 [sic]: Women in Pakistan. And economic and social strategy, Country Report, Washington, D.C.

Evidence from micro-level surveys, combined with deductions from the official statistics and more informal research and analysis, suggest a conservative estimate of about 20-30% of the female urban population working, in the formal and the informal sectors combined. This is based on full-time equivalents, but would represent a greater number of part-time workers. Altogether, it is likely that the total female work force in the urban sector (formal plus informal) is just under 2.5 million women (full-time equivalents), including about 2 million in the informal sector.2

2 See Part II, Chapter X (including Figure 10.1), for an elaboration of the basis of this estimate.

Anmerkungen

This is how a regular quotation looks like in Af. Mark the (sometimes distorting) differences to the original text.

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(Graf Isolan)


[2.] Af/Fragment 053 13 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-04-09 15:30:37 Schumann
Af, BauernOpfer, Fragment, Gesichtet, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop, World Bank 1990

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Seite: 53, Zeilen: 13-18, (19-28)
Quelle: World Bank 1990
Seite(n): 92-93, Zeilen: 92: 26-32.(38-45-93: 1-2)
5.3 The gendered structure of the informal sector

There is a distant [sic] difference between male and female informal labour markets. The male labour market spectrum includes, at one end, unskilled, marginal workers subsisting in such casual jobs as hawking and car washing and, at the other end, small-scale, family owned enterprises that are visible, efficient, and labour intensive. The informal labour market is organized along different lines, because women’s choice of activity is determined by the norms of female seclusion.

Work in which contact with males cannot be avoided is associated with loss of respect and diminished marriage prospects for single girls. Thus Pakistan’s informal urban labour market is highly segregated, even for a Muslim country. The workers, street vendors, market sellers, carpenters, mechanics, and barbers are almost exclusively male. Women are confined to being domestic servants (who work in a home when the master of the house is away at work and have dealings only with the mistress) or home-based workers (who stitch clothes, make lace, weave baskets, embroider, make food products and “bidis”; home made cigarettes, for sales by male family members or middleman) (World Bank 1989:55f)
[page 92]

10.12 There is a distinct difference between male and female informal labor markets. The male labor market spectrum includes, at one end, unskilled marginal workers subsisting in such casual jobs as hawking and car washing and, at the other end, small-scale, family owned enterprises that are viable, efficient, and labor-intensive. The informal female labor market is organized along different lines, because women's choice of activity is determined by the norms of female seclusion.

[...] Work in which contact with males cannot be avoided is associated with loss of respect and diminished marriage prospects for single girls. Thus Pakistan's urban informal labor market is highly segregated, even for a Muslim country. The workers, street vendors, market sellers, carpenters, mechanics, and barbers are almost exclusively male. Women are confined to being domestic servants (who work in a home mostly when the master of the house is away at work and have dealings only with the mistress) or home-based workers (who

[page 93]

stitch clothes, make lace, weave baskets, embroider, make food products and home-made cigarettes, etc., for sale by male family members or middlemen).

Anmerkungen

One part has been clearly marked as a citation (and is not counted) - although the page number is wrong - but another one, which has been taken verbatim, too, is not marked as a citation at all.

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(Graf Isolan) Schumann


[3.] Af/Fragment 113 13 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-04-09 15:38:36 Schumann
Af, BauernOpfer, Fragment, Gesichtet, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop, World Bank 1990

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Seite: 113, Zeilen: (12-13), 13-21
Quelle: World Bank 1990
Seite(n): 89, Zeilen: 28-37
The World Bank (1989:89) estimates that seventy percent of Pakistan’s urban labour force is engaged in informal sector activities. Here, the informal sector predominantly consist of a large number of small-scale production and service activities that are individually or family owned and use indigenous inputs and labour intensive, simple technology. It overlaps the small scale sub-sector, particularly household enterprises, and covers much of the “service” sector outside public service. The usually self-employed workers in this sector are engaged in activities ranging from hawking, street-vending, marketing, knife-sharpening, shoe-shining, and junk-collecting to selling fruits, vegetables, etc. Other find jobs as mechanics, blacksmith, carpenters, small artisans, handicraft workers, potters, barbers and domestics.

World Bank, 1998: Women in Pakistan. And economic and social strategy, Country Report, Washington, D.C.

10.09 The urban informal sector is characterized by a large number of small-scale production and service activities that are individually or family owned and use indigenous inputs and labor-intensive, simple technology. It overlaps the small scale sub-sector, particularly household enterprises, and covers much of the "service" sector outside public service. The usually self-employed workers in this sector are engaged in activities ranging from hawking, street-vending, marketing, knife-sharpening, shoe-shining, and junk-collecting to selling fruits, vegetables, etc. Others find jobs as mechanics, blacksmiths, carpenters, small artisans, handicraft workers, potters, barbers, and domestics.
Anmerkungen

Indeed the source has been given. Nevertheless, since nothing has been marked as a citation it is not clear to the reader that the whole paragraph has been taken verbatim.

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(Graf Isolan) Schumann


[4.] Af/Fragment 134 34 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-04-09 15:42:31 Schumann
Af, Fragment, Gesichtet, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop, Verschleierung, World Bank 1990

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Seite: 134, Zeilen: 34-36
Quelle: World Bank 1990
Seite(n): xxi, Zeilen: 21-24
Women suffer additional constraints because their mobility is restricted, they have very little control over resources, have limited decision-making power, less knowledge of awareness of their rights, a poor self concept and limited aspirations. "[...] Women suffer additional constraints because their mobility is restricted, they have little control over resources, limited decision-making power, a low level of awareness of their civic rights, a poor self-concept, and limited aspirations."9

9 from Chapter 33 of the Seventh Five-Year Plan, "Women's Development: A National Imperative", pp.245, 246.

Anmerkungen

No source given. Nothing has been marked as a citation.

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(Graf Isolan) Schumann