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Autor     Tasneem Ahmar
Titel    Gender and Media: Pakistan Perspective
Sammlung    SAFMA Regional Workshop - Gender and Media in South Asia, Kathmandu, Nepal June 26-27, 2004
Ort    Kathmandu, Nepal
Datum    26-27. June 2004
URL    http://web.archive.org/web/20060222045508/http://www.southasianmedia.net/conference/Gender_and_Media/gender_and_media2.htm

Literaturverz.   

yes
Fußnoten    yes
Fragmente    4


Fragmente der Quelle:
[1.] Af/Fragment 036 12 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-03-20 00:34:25 [[Benutzer:|]]
Af, Ahmar 2004, Fragment, Gesichtet, KomplettPlagiat, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop

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KomplettPlagiat
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SleepyHollow02
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Yes.png
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 36, Zeilen: 12-15
Quelle: Ahmar 2004
Seite(n): online, Zeilen: 0
Although the media in Pakistan is becoming supportive towards women in their struggle against discrimination and cases of violence against women are reported more frequently, the existing and at times growing shades of bias and insensitivity need to be examined. Although the media in Pakistan is becoming supportive towards women in their struggle against discrimination and cases of violence against women are reported more frequently, the existing and at times growing shades of bias and insensitivity need to be examined.
Anmerkungen
Sichter
(SleepyHollow02) Schumann


[2.] Af/Fragment 036 20 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-04-01 22:06:42 [[Benutzer:|]]
Af, Ahmar 2004, BauernOpfer, Fragment, Gesichtet, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop

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Graf Isolan
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Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 36, Zeilen: 20-40
Quelle: Ahmar 2004
Seite(n): 1 (Internetversion), Zeilen: 16-18, 23-35, 87 ff.
In examining gender patterns in the Pakistani media, one needs to analyse the participation and position of women in the media, and the impact of those positions, on women’s development. In the 57-year history of Pakistan, no woman has ever been editor of an Urdu newspaper and only one woman (Dr. Maleeha Lodhi - The Muslim) has been editor of any English daily. The official wire service APP has never had a woman Director General. The Herald was the only English political monthly that had a woman editor as well as a predominantly female staff. In Urdu and regional language press (that captures more than 80% of the newspaper market), there are very few women workers. The state-controlled Pakistan Television Corporation has had one woman reaching the top position of Managing Director and another woman that of Director Programmes. But state-owned Pakistan Broadcasting Corporation has never had a woman as Director General. The many, new private television and radio channels have no doubt employed many young women as reporters and DJs, but this is where it all stops (T. Ahmar: 2004).

It is felt that reporting on violence against women that includes domestic and institutional atrocities needs much improvement. The women in the cases of rape are the worst victims. A lot of newspapers report with a bias against these women and reinforce the existing non-supportive attitude of the society towards women. No wonder then that the official reaction to rape continues to be that of accusation towards women. As for television coverage of rape and other forms of violence against women, it is noted with much resentment that many a times these victims of violent acts are put through double humiliation with extensive and most of the times unnecessary coverage.

In examining gender patterns in South Asian and particularly in the Pakistani media, we need to analyse the participation and position of women in the media, and the impact of those positions, on women’s development. [...] For example, in the 54-year history of Pakistan, no woman has ever been editor of an Urdu newspaper and only one woman (Dr. Maleeha Lodhi - The Muslim) has been editor of any English daily. The official wire service APP has never had a woman Director General. The Herald was the only English political monthly that had a woman editor as well as a predominantly female staff. This group later resigned en masse from Herald and brought out another political/social magazine The Newsline. In Urdu and regional language press (that captures more than 80% of the newspaper market), there are very few women workers. The state-controlled Pakistan Television Corporation has had one woman reaching the top position of Managing Director and another woman that of Director Programmes. But state-owned Pakistan Broadcasting Corporation has never had a woman as Director General. The many, new private television and radio channels have no doubt employed many young women as reporters and DJs, but this is where it all stops.

[...]

Covering Crime

It is felt that reporting on violence against women that includes domestic and institutional atrocities needs much improvement. The women in the cases of rape are the worst victims. A lot of newspapers report with a bias against these women and reinforce the existing non-supportive attitude of the society towards women. No wonder then that the official reaction to rape continues to be that of accusation towards women. As for television coverage of rape and other forms of violence against women, it is noted with much resentment that many a times these victims of violent acts are put through double humiliation with extensive and most of the times unnecessary coverage.

Anmerkungen

Almost identical, only the year of the founding of Pakistan is updated. However, the source (2004) states 54 years, the 2005 thesis states 57 years. Neither date matches, Pakistan achieved own dominion in 1947. Although the original author is named nothing has been marked as a citation.

Sichter
(Graf Isolan), SleepyHollow02


[3.] Af/Fragment 037 01 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-03-21 22:45:44 [[Benutzer:|]]
Af, Ahmar 2004, Fragment, Gesichtet, KomplettPlagiat, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop

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SleepyHollow02
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Quelle: Ahmar 2004
Seite(n): Internet Quelle, Zeilen: online
[This is most] evident in cases where high government officials are shown visiting the place of crime and sympathizing with the victims and the families.

There is a marked increase in women’s magazines focusing heavily on the domestic side of women and the intellectual qualities of women are mentioned nowhere. Their abilities as equal partners in developments are lost between cooking oils and fairness creams. The lower to middle and upper class women are being brainwashed to either perform their reproductive duties rather than productive ones or put their physical beauty on top priority. Some of these magazines and digests are also supporting the reactionary views that if women remain within the confines of their homes and stay out of public life, so many of our social ills would be overcome. The same trend can be witnessed in the ever increasing numbers of teleplays that focus on women being the focal point of domestic peace and harmony.

The media in Pakistan has no problems while exposing physical and sexual features of women but is reluctant to bring forward issues of HIV/AIDS, sexual harassment, sex and flesh trade, trafficking on the pretext of obscenity. This is regardless the fact that each one of these issues is directly linked with poverty, women’s inferior position in the society and denial of basic human rights.

Pakistani media, specially the Urdu and regional language press, indulges in a particular kind of gender-insensitive behavior whereby the language used is not only abusive and sexist, but also extremely judgmental, lacking any investigative or analytical value. While the print media accuses the woman of all sins: ‘Kanwari Maan ne Gunahoon ka bojh kooray key dher par phaink diya’ (virgin mother throws her burden of sins on a garbage dump), saat bachoon ki ma aashna key sath bagh gayi (mother of seven elopes with lover), many teleplays are using biased language like: ‘aurat to hoti hi Naqasul Aqal hey, (a woman is intellectually inferior), baiti ka bojh jatni jaldi uttar jayey uttna hi acha hey (the burden of a daughter needs to be taken off as quickly as possible) etc. These remarks and statements continue to victimize women and reinforce already existing negative images.

In all these years, Pakistan has not been able to come up with a consistent media policy. It varies from mild liberalism to rigid orthodoxy. Ironically, each change has had an impact on women and their development. We have witnessed women getting a greater exposure in some regimes than others. Although the state-policies are only applicable on the electronic media, the print media has also been greatly impacted by the shifts and changes in the way women are projected. The increasing shades of violence and glamour on the electronic media can be seen spilling over into the print media.

This is most evident in cases where high government officials are shown visiting the place of crime and sympathising with the victims and the families.

Stereotypical images

There is a marked increase in women’s magazines that are home, kitchen and fashion-based. These magazines are focusing heavily on the domestic side of women and trying to prove that every woman needs to be a perfect cook, a tailor, and housekeeper and also be beautiful. The intellectual qualities of women are mentioned nowhere. Their abilities as equal partners in developments are lost between cooking oils and fairness creams. [...] The lower to middle and upper class women are being brainwashed to either perform their reproductive duties rather than productive ones or put their physical beauty on top priority. Some of these magazines and digests are also supporting the reactionary views that if women remain within the confines of their homes and stay out of public life, so many of our social ills would be overcome. The same trend can be witnessed in the ever increasing numbers of teleplays that focus on women being the focal point of domestic peace and harmony.

Hypocrisy in media portrayal

The media in Pakistan has no problems while exposing physical and sexual features of women but is reluctant to bring forward issues of HIV/AIDS, sexual harassment, sex and flesh trade, trafficking on the pretext of obscenity. This is regardless the fact that each one of these issues is directly linked with poverty, women’s inferior position in the society and denial of basic human rights. [...]


Use of derogatory language

Pakistani media, specially the Urdu and regional language press, indulges in a particular kind of gender-insensitive behavior whereby the language used is not only abusive and sexist, but also extremely judgmental, lacking any investigative or analytical value. While the print media accuses the woman of all sins: ‘Kanwari Maan ne Gunahoon ka bojh kooray key dher par phaink diya’ (virgin mother throws her burden of sins on a garbage dump), saat bachoon ki ma aashna key sath bagh gayi (mother of seven elopes with lover), many teleplays are using biased language like: ‘aurat to hoti hi Naqasul Aqal hey, (a woman is intellectually inferior), baiti ka bojh jatni jaldi uttar jayey uttna hi acha hey (the burden of a daughter needs to be taken off as quickly as possible) etc. These remarks and statements continue to victimize women and reinforce already existing negative images.

Absence of gender-sensitive media policies

[...] Thus, in all these years, Pakistan has not been able to come up with a consistent media policy. It varies from mild liberalism to rigid orthodoxy. Ironically, each change has had an impact on women and their development. We have witnessed women getting a greater exposure in some regimes than others. [...] Although the state-policies are only applicable on the electronic media, the print media has also been greatly impacted by the shifts and changes in the way women are projected. The increasing shades of violence and glamour on the electronic media can be seen spilling over into the print media.

Anmerkungen

The source is not given.

Sichter
(SleepyHollow02), WiseWoman


[4.] Af/Fragment 139 32 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-03-16 07:52:36 [[Benutzer:|]]
Af, Ahmar 2004, Fragment, Gesichtet, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop, Verschleierung

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Schumann
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Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 139, Zeilen: 32-37
Quelle: Ahmar 2004
Seite(n): online, Zeilen: 0
There is a need to create a gender-friendly media based on dialogue and debate rather than on stereotypical perceptions and images of women.

There is a need to develop alternative (gender-neutral and non-sexist) concepts, approaches, and strategies for women’s development for use by male and female journalists and editors, to enable them to understand, recognize and acknowledge the multidimensional roles played by women in society.

There is a need to develop alternative (gender-neutral and non-sexist) concepts, approaches, and strategies for women’s development for use by male and female journalists and editors, to enable them to understand, recognize and acknowledge the multi-dimensional roles played by women in society. [...]

[...]

This, when achieved, will undoubtedly help to create a gender-friendly media based on dialogue and debate rather than on stereotypical perceptions and images of women.

Anmerkungen

No source given. Nothing has been marked as a citation.

Note that this passage appears in the "Conclusion and Policy Implications"-part of Af's thesis and is supposed to be Af's own findings.

Sichter
(Schumann), SleepyHollow02